Tag Archives: Sugar Pine Foundation

Following Through

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Do you remember what you did for Earth Day last week? Earth Day was exactly 7 days ago. Is what you did still helping this planet? I was convicted this weekend and week about following through for our planet.

Last week for Earth Day the Sugar Pine Foundation came to Patagonia and we planted 250 Jeffrey Pine seedlings on the hill next to Patagonia. It was great! We worked hard, had a great time, and felt like we were doing something great for the environment in our neighborhood. Here is a link to the blog post I wrote on the event.

On Friday of last week I walked out on the hill to check on the baby seedlings. The trees were starting to brown on their tips and the soil was bone dry. They didn’t have any water! They went from growing up in Tahoe, being watered everyday and living in healthy soil to this dry desert soil with no water for over a week! That’s the kind of change that sends trees into shock. I went and grabbed two buckets and watered all the trees I had planted and some others I found that others had planted.

I realized that if I don’t go up on the hill and water the trees as often as possible they will not make it in this harsh environment. I find it quite ironic that Reno has been experiencing the weirdest spring, with random snow and rain mixed with temperatures in the high 70’s, but ever since we planted the baby seedlings we haven’t received a drop of precipitation.

So that’s where I was convicted. I had done my part on Earth Day, and it felt great. Planting trees and cleaning up the river, doing great things. BUT, in order for my efforts on Earth Day to actually transform into a beautiful pine tree I’m going to have to think about the trees I planted every week and follow through by watering them throughout the year, for many years to come.

Did you do something similar to me? Are you following through on it? I challenge you to make a goal for the year that shows your consciousness to our environment. Follow through each week for a full year, and let’s see what blossoms from it! Post your ideas here!

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Planting with the Sugar Pine Foundation!

Today I had an opportunity to help the environment literally right in my own backyard. Patagonia, where I work, is located right on the Truckee river. On the opposite side of the trail are trails, a ditch creek, and some good hikes.

Many employees go walk or run the trails on lunch breaks and many non-Patagonia employees hike on these trails everyday. The hill used to be a forest that ran up to the river on the south side, but deforestation has left it a desert.

Today the sugar pine foundation came to our work and employees volunteered to plant baby Jeffrey Pines along the hillside. I was able to participate and the group planted over 250 baby Jeffrey Pines!

First, you find a nice flat, north facing area that can provide shade for the baby tree. Areas where water will naturally run were preferred because Nevada is so dry that these trees need as much water as they can get.

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Here are some baby seedlings that we planted.

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A picture of the seedling in the hole before filling it.

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Dig the hole about a shovel head’s length deep. Fill it with dirt and pack it down. Throw some mulch over it and then give it some water.

Patagonia employees planted 250 trees along the side of the hill that is on the other side of the river. If everybody helps out, waters the seedlings, and we get some good rain, we should be able to see some trees on the desert hill soon!

It was awesome to help out and give back to the area where I spend time working and running on my lunch breaks. I can’t wait to come back in years and see these trees grow up big! I love giving back to the earth that gives me so much.

I encourage everyone to get out there and do at least one event or volunteer opportunity like this, because everyone helping out can do so much for our environment that we enjoy everyday. Get out there and give back this spring, come back here and share what you did!

 

Sugar Pine Foundation

I want to share another organization, similar to Keep Tahoe Blue that is making an effort to conserve and restore the beautiful environment around us in the Reno and Tahoe area. The group is called the Sugar Pine Foundation, have you heard of it?

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This group is specifically dedicated to restoring the white pines in our area by involving the community in forest stewardship. They have an awesome mission that is trying to restore and ensure the “natural regeneration of sugar pines and other white pines in the Tahoe Basin and surrounding areas.”

The awesome thing about this group is that they want to involve our community in this form of forest stewardship. They want each individual to become aware of the regeneration process because at the end of the day the group can’t do it all. They need us to step up and be responsible for our environment and the footprint that we leave. 

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To look at the organization in further detail, The Sugar Pine Foundation is a non-profit group that was founded in 2004. They specifically are looking to save the trees and forests from the threat of white pine blister rust, otherwise known as “Cronartium ribicola.” This is a non-native, incurable fungus that kills white pines. The foundation seeks out trees that are resistant to the fungus, collects their seeds, and plant the progeny through the Tahoe Basin. 

Patagonia partners with this group and helps to fund the awesome work that they do in our area. At least once a year my work takes volunteers out with the foundation to plant seeds, work in the forests, and learn about the fungus. It is Patagonia’s way of helping to fund their mission and let the volunteers know how they affect and can help this white pines in our backyard! You can visit the organization’s website or their Facebook page

The weather is continuing to look nice for this weekend! What are you going to do outdoors this weekend? Come back here and talk about it!

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